Since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games, many studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes without any differences regarding socio-economic status or continental location. Poor oral health is an important issue as it has a clear impact on quality of life, confidence, appearance and socialisation. It also has an impact on sport performance and training with impaired preparation for competition. Many causes to impaired oral health can include nutritional diet and carbohydrate supplementation, oral dehydration, depression of various aspect of the immune function due to intense exercise, negative health behaviours, lack of awareness, time and prioritisation.
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The Youth Olympic Games were introduced in 2010 with the aim to bring young athletes not only an experience of competition on the world stage, but also to help them learn about the Olympic values, explore other cultures and develop the skills to become true ambassadors. The Lausanne 2020 Games provided an excellent opportunity to develop innovative concepts for health promotion and sports-related prevention. The enthusiasm across various sectors of society (political, academic and economy) empowered us to bring together multiple skills to materialize the IOC’s pledge.
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Die Änderungen des öffentlichen Lebens, Isolation, Quarantäne und damit verbundene weitere Einschränkungen der gewohnten Routine sowie Ängste und Sorgen sind nur einige Beispiele für die psychischen Belastungen durch die COVID-19-Pandemie (1). Nicht nur die Normalbevölkerung, sondern auch bzw. vor allem Leistungssportler sind diesen Belastungen ausgesetzt, und Leistungssport ist in Zeiten von COVID-19 nur noch stark eingeschränkt denkbar. Von einem Tag auf den anderen änderten sich für Sportler über Jahre und Jahrzehnte etablierte Tagesstrukturen und Gewohnheiten.
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It’s been a while since Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was characterized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO), causing major concerns and unfortunately panic in many countries. The on-going outbreak is of international concern and most countries have already announced a series of protective measures to confront this health threat of unknown magnitude. Travel warnings, scientific congress suspensions, cancellations of national holidays and closing of schools, amusement parks, cinemas, theatres and gyms are only some of these measures.
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Up to 40% of all athletes suffer from patellofemoral disorders every season, with a high prevalence of 15-25% especially in pivoting sports [1]. It has a high risk of recurrence, might persist for a prolonged time and therefore considerably influence the athlete’s trainability and performance over his career. Exercise-related, peripatellar pain is the most frequent observed condition and usually described as anterior knee pain (AKP), or synonymously called patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).
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A common complaint in the musculoskeletal system is the anterior knee pain (AKP) or the so called patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The large number of contributing factors that lead to the symptoms make a proper diagnosis and targeted physiotherapeutic treatment management difficult. With regard to symptom-complex-oriented physiotherapeutic care, the question arises as to which therapy methods should be used for individuals with AKP. In order to be able to identify adequate physical therapy methods, an understanding of the clinical condition and the chosen treatment method is essential. This article aims to present a heuristic model of objectives and situational physiotherapeutic treatment methods.
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Patients with a patellofemoral pain are either in an acute state after a patellofemoral dislocation or are suffering from a chronic anterior knee pain (AKP), whereas AKP might be accompanied by patellar instability without dislocation. Whereas the acute state after a dislocation is mostly clear and its examination limited, the examination of a AKP is much more complex. A profound knowledge of the anatomy, the painful structures and patellofemoral biomechanics is essential in order to find the underlying pathology within the heterogeneous and diverse etiologies. Furthermore, a meticulous and precise examination is key to find the adequate treatment for AKP.
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Lateral patellar dislocation (PD) has multifactorial origin. Its treatment will depend on the physical demands of the patient, triggering event and injury mechanism of PD, number of dislocation episodes, patellofemoral joint morphology, and concomitant injuries. After primary PD, despite the risk of recurrence being 33-77%, first treatment option is mostly conservative, except if an osteochondral fragment needs to be refixed or removed.
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Clinical imaging in patellofemoral disorders is fundamental for the understanding of the pathology, and to find the adequate treatment option. Anatomical risk factors such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, lateralized tibiale tubercle (measured by the tibiale tubercle trochlear groove distance), torsional or coronal lower limb alignment that are the origine of patellar maltracking or even patellar dislocation, can be assessed with high reliability on conventional radiographs combined with MR imaging.
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Patients with a patellofemoral pain are either in an acute state after a patellofemoral dislocation or are suffering from a chronic anterior knee pain (AKP), whereas AKP might be accompanied by patellar instability without dislocation. Whereas the acute state after a dislocation is mostly clear and its examination limited, the examination of a AKP is much more complex. A profound knowledge of the anatomy, the painful structures and patellofemoral biomechanics is essential in order to find the underlying pathology within the heterogeneous and diverse etiologies. Furthermore, a meticulous and precise examination is key to find the adequate treatment for AKP.
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Objectives: The objectives of this study were to observe the developmental trajectories of motivation types among young children from 8 to 12 years using a more comprehensive scale of physical education motivation. We also tested the relations between these trajectories and objective physical activity during this period.
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Physical inactivity is a known risk factor for stroke. The interaction between exercise and risk of stroke is complex. Physical activity has a beneficial effect on most risk factors for stroke, which may show reciprocal potentiation (e.g. obesity, sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation). Advice on physical activity is of importance in primary prevention of stroke. Hereby, type, amount and intensity of physical activity may be distinguished and adjusted according to comorbidities (e.g. in case of heart failure).
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There is a continuous increase in dementia partly due to increasing life-expectance. Currently there are no causal therapies for dementia, neither for dementias with vascular etiology nor for neurodegenerative dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. Main risk factors for the development of dementia are low physical activity, hypertonia and diabetes mellitus. Physical activity has shown to exert beneficial effects on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors und is closely connected with cognitive disturbance and the development and the course of dementia. Therefore, the implementation of physical activity in preventive and therapeutic strategies of dementia is recom­mended.
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This case report presents the evolution of physiological and psychological health parameters of a former sedentary and physically inactive nursing student during an 18 months period (three academic semesters), during which she first took part to a one-semester institutional physical activity (PA) program offered by her University, before being selected to participate in relay to the Race Across America (RAAM) with a team of the University. The four months before the RAAM, she followed a cycling specific training program. After the RAAM, she was followed-up the next eight months.
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After having a stroke the main challenges are reducing the risk of recurrent stroke, improving impaired brain function, quality of life, independence in activities of daily living and reintegration into the community. [1] Lesion-induced impairment of brain function also has, besides its effects on e.g. motor, sensory, visual and speech function, an influence on e.g. cognition and mood, all of which are determinants of post-stroke physical activity. The evidence for a benefit of physical activity in secondary stroke prevention is increasing and treatment strategies aimed at factors which are limiting physical activity are more and more recognized.
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