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rehabilitation

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Life post Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) will not be same for anyone and like so many professions it will be a challenging time for physiotherapists and health care providers. A lot of practitioners are going through economic challenges because of the imposed lock down in various countries. As the situation recovers and more people resume their working life, we physiotherapists should be more concerned now while attending to our clients. As front-line practitioners, physiotherapists are more prone to have direct contact with patients affected with COVID-19.
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After having a stroke the main challenges are reducing the risk of recurrent stroke, improving impaired brain function, quality of life, independence in activities of daily living and reintegration into the community. [1] Lesion-induced impairment of brain function also has, besides its effects on e.g. motor, sensory, visual and speech function, an influence on e.g. cognition and mood, all of which are determinants of post-stroke physical activity. The evidence for a benefit of physical activity in secondary stroke prevention is increasing and treatment strategies aimed at factors which are limiting physical activity are more and more recognized.
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This article aims to summarize the literature on the role of physical activity in cancer patients and to propose exercise programs based on studies and recommendations. Medical advances with improved early diagnosis and treatment have increased the number of cancer survivors. At the same time, the quality of life of these patients must also be improved. In the different stages of the disease physical activity has an important role to play with its beneficial effects on fatigue, physical condition, mood etc. Collaboration between health system actors and patient education are the key to success in this multi-disciplinary care.
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Gait impairments in simultaneous motor-cognitive tasks have been well documented in neurodegenerative disease populations, including Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The consequences of these gait impairments in patient populations include an increased fall risk, sedentariness, functional decreases, decreases in self-efficacy, and overall reduced quality of life. Therefore, improving gait performance in dual-task situations is becoming an important focus of rehabilitation for people with neurological disorders.
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