Gendered norms, stereotypes and biases implicitly influence our thoughts, attitudes and behaviours. These often lead to gender inequity, a phenomenon inherent in society and reflected in its various contexts. The increasing awareness of this inequity is leading to reflection and changes in society as a whole and its communities, organisations and institutions. In scientific disciplines, gender inequity has been, and still is, a point of discussion and consideration. In many cases, these discussions have led to positive and sustainable changes at both a structural as well as a policy level. This opinion piece discusses gender inequity in the context of sport science and, in particular, sport medicine in Switzerland. Specifically, academic position (professorships), first authorship of peer-reviewed publications in the SEMS-Journal as well as conference participation and scientific awards in two Swiss sport science organisations: Sportwissenschaftliche Gesellschaft der Schweiz (SGS) and Sport & Exercise Medicine Switzerland (SEMS) in terms of frequency are presented and discussed. An under-representation of women is observed in most categories. Finally, recommendations for promoting and supporting equity while maintaining an objective consideration of quality criteria and individual ability are put forward using examples of good practice.
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In competitive sports, mental health and well-being is of great significance [1]. This applies to the active phase, as well as the time after the career. Mental disorders are common in competitive sports [2]. Physical and psychological well-being and performance in sports relate to each other [2]: Emotional strains and illnesses in sport may have an influence on the performance, may increase the risk for injuries and may lengthen rehabilitation. Injuries have an influence on the performance, too, and are strains and risks for mental health. The requirements in elite sports call for a safe and sound judgement and handling with strains and risks for mental health, as well as in diagnosis and treatment on illness [1].
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Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common psychiatric disorder in the peripartum period affecting approximately 8% of European women without prior psychiatric history [1] and even more with pre-existing depressive disorders. Up to 70% of new mothers develop mild depressive symptoms called “baby-blues” which include weepiness, sadness and mood lability.
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Women in sport – an almost inexhaustible topic that has been neglected for a long time. Female Athletes conquer discipline after discipline – including the associated injuries. Common sports injuries in female athletes include stress fractures, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and sport related concussions (SRC). Less commonly recognized are the specific sex differences that lead to these injuries. An understanding of these factors can improve their clinical management including surgical treatment, the rehabilitation phase and return to play.
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The positive effects of light to moderately intensive physical activity during pregnancy are not in question. Corresponding exercise recommendations can be found in national and international guidelines, which show a relatively solid evidence base. However, there are large knowledge gaps with respect to training recommendations for ambitious amateur sportswomen and elite athletes. Therefore, among both athletes and their supporting staff there is a large degree of uncertainty, which sports activity and to what extent it can be maintained safely without risk to the mother and her unborn child. In addition to the consideration of contraindications, where sporting activities must be avoided, there are certain training-associated precautions (e.g. when training at high altitude or in hot conditions) that should be respected. Also, in view of the manifold physiological changes that pregnancy entails (e.g. anatomical, hormonal, metabolic, cardiovascular and pulmonary), competitive sports-oriented training should be directed individually under close observation of mother's and child's well-being.
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Female athletes who are concerned with their own cycle can make better use of benefits and better control the negative effects of it through targeted training adjustments. However, there are still few studies that deal with the sport-specific advantages and disadvantages of the female cycle. Hormonal contraception should also be selected individually to suit the type of sport and any complaints the athlete may have.
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Life post Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) will not be same for anyone and like so many professions it will be a challenging time for physiotherapists and health care providers. A lot of practitioners are going through economic challenges because of the imposed lock down in various countries. As the situation recovers and more people resume their working life, we physiotherapists should be more concerned now while attending to our clients. As front-line practitioners, physiotherapists are more prone to have direct contact with patients affected with COVID-19.
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Summary: Muscle damage as well as recurrent and serious infections especially to the end of the playing period in team sport or to the end of preparation for competition in endurance or single sport are the most common symptoms in elite sport demolishing optimal training results. Are VitaminD deficiency responsible for these symptoms in elite sport.
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While addictive disorders involving substances are well researched, the field of behavioral addictions, including exercise addiction, is in its infancy. Although exercise addiction is not yet recognized as a psychiatric disorder, evidence for the burden it imposes has gained attention in the last decade. Characterised by a rigid exercise schedule, the prioritization of exercise over one’s own health, family and professional life, and mental wellbeing, and extreme distress when exercise is halted, the phenomenon shares many feature with substance use disorders.
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Die Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Sportpsychiatrie und -psychotherapie SGSPP wurde am 29. März 2019 in den Räumen der Privatklinik Wyss AG in Münchenbuchsee, Kanton Bern gegründet. Sie ist weltweit, nach der International Society of Sports Psychiatry ISSP, die zweite sportpsychiatrische und -psychotherapeutische Fachgesellschaft und zudem die erste nationale Fachgesellschaft dieser Art.
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For nearly a century it has been hypothesized, that repetitive head trauma can lead to adverse neurological and psychiatric conditions [1]. Still, it took the discovery of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) in a player of the National Football League to bring widespread public and scientific attention to this important topic on the intersection of neurology, psychiatry and sports medicine [2,3].
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