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sports psychology

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While addictive disorders involving substances are well researched, the field of behavioral addictions, including exercise addiction, is in its infancy. Although exercise addiction is not yet recognized as a psychiatric disorder, evidence for the burden it imposes has gained attention in the last decade. Characterised by a rigid exercise schedule, the prioritization of exercise over one’s own health, family and professional life, and mental wellbeing, and extreme distress when exercise is halted, the phenomenon shares many feature with substance use disorders.
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For nearly a century it has been hypothesized, that repetitive head trauma can lead to adverse neurological and psychiatric conditions [1]. Still, it took the discovery of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) in a player of the National Football League to bring widespread public and scientific attention to this important topic on the intersection of neurology, psychiatry and sports medicine [2,3].
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Major depressive Disorder (MDD) is a widespread and burdensome disease. People with MDD suffer from loss of interest and pleasure in activities that they would usually enjoy. In addition, they report anxiety, complex somatic pain syndromes, cognitive restrictions, loss of sexual interest, impaired sleep and social withdrawal. MDD is the leading cause for years lived with disability (YLD) in women and men and has a lifetime prevalence of 10-20 %.
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Changes in public life, isolation, quarantine, and associated constraints within usual routine, as well as anxieties and concerns, are just some of many examples of psychiatric burdens caused by the COVID-19 pandemic (1). Not only the general population, but professional athletes in particular, are exposed to these challenges, as professional sports came to an abrupt halt upon occurrence of COVID-19.
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder which is characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. The estimated prevalence of ADHD in the general population is 7,2% in children, with persistence into adulthood of approximately 35%. [1,2]
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