Category

physical education

Category
Competitive and elite sport often challenges the balance between health and performance, especially when it involves youth athletes. As Lausanne was getting ready to host the 2020 winter Youth Olympic Games, we had the opportunity to reflect on these challenges and on what they mean for sports medicine practitioners. Elite sport pushes athletes to the limit, be it through their own intrinsic drive to achieve ever more, or through the pressures of the multiple stakeholders around sport.
Read More
Objective: The objective of the project is to actively integrate students partially dispensed from school sport through an adapted form of sports dispensation as well as a customized selection of exercises. Method: By means of two online questionnaires, both structured similarly with respect to questions and main themes, a needs assessment was carried out. The questionnaires were sent by e-mail to 2600 members of three Swiss medical associations, doctors of the University Children’s hospital of Basel as well as to approximately 4000 sports teachers of the Swiss organization for sports at school.
Read More
This paper highlights the findings of a comparative cross-sectional study in the cantons of Uri (UR) and Schwyz (SZ). In this study, participating in sports and daily physical activity among 5th grades were observed trough selected indicators. The study was conducted in autumn 2012 and 2013 and included a randomly selected sample of 161 pupils in Uri (10.6±0.7 year olds) and 261 pupils in the canton of Schwyz (10.7±0.7 year olds). In both regions, a high rate of participation in free time sports activities could be detected: 68.8% (UR) and 70.1% (SZ) of all the children involved are members of a sports club, with more than half of them, being active, both in and outside of sports club.
Read More
In addition to the delivery of primary care services, recent changes to the NHS in the United Kingdom have placed increasing responsibility on GPs for the commissioning of the full range of health services from prevention through to clinical interventions and rehabilitation. Whilst historically there has always been an expectation that primary care professionals were ideally placed to provide support for prevention as well as treatment, their active engagement in the promotion of physical activity has remained largely superficial.
Read More
Objectives: Growing interest in physical activity has led to the development of a number of organizations, networks and associations, including grass-root, professional and academic institutions. To maximize relevance and effectiveness of work undertaken in this field, we aimed at developing a systematic overview of institutions active in health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA).
Read More
HEPA Europe, the European network for the promotion of health-enhancing physical activity, will have its 10th annual meeting in 2014. Membership of the network has grown to 129 institutions from 32 countries. Collaborations have been established with the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Union (EU), Agita Mundo, the global network for physical activity promotion, other regional networks, and the International Society for Physical Activity and Health. Physical activity has moved up on the public agenda; in 2013 the EU Council adopted its first ever Council Recommendation in sport, notably on promoting health-enhancing physical activity, and in 2014 WHO has begun the development of a Physical Activity Strategy for the European region.
Read More